An analysis of the creation of a black hole in astronomic research

Rather, it is a great amount of matter packed into a very small area - think of a star ten times more massive than the Sun squeezed into a sphere approximately the diameter of New York City. The result is a gravitational field so strong that nothing, not even light, can escape. In recent years, NASA instruments have painted a new picture of these strange objects that are, to many, the most fascinating objects in space. Intense X-ray flares thought to be caused by a black hole devouring a star.

An analysis of the creation of a black hole in astronomic research

This result comes from analysis of X-ray data from Chandra in the weeks and months after the initial detection of gravitational waves. If confirmed, GW would contain the lowest-mass black hole known. The Chandra data were critical in determining if the neutron star merger created a heavier neutron star or a black hole.

The spectacular merger of two neutron stars that generated gravitational waves announced last fall likely did something else: This newly spawned black hole would be the lowest mass black hole ever found, as described in our latest press release. After two separate stars underwent supernova explosions, two ultra-dense cores that is, neutron stars were left behind.

These two neutron stars were so close that gravitational wave radiation pulled them together until they merged and collapsed into a black hole. The purple material depicts debris from the merger.

An analysis of the creation of a black hole in astronomic research

An additional illustration shows the black hole that resulted from the merger, along with a disk of infalling matter and a jet of high-energy particles. X-rays from Chandra are critical for understanding what happened after the two neutron stars collided.

Chandra observed GW multiple times. An observation two to three days after the event failed to detect a source, but subsequent observations 9, 15 and 16 days after the event, resulted in detections bottom left. The source went behind the Sun soon after, but further brightening was seen in Chandra observations about days after the event bottom rightfollowed by comparable X-ray intensity after about days.

If the neutron stars merged and formed a heavier neutron star, then astronomers would expect it to spin rapidly and generate a very strong magnetic field. This, in turn, would have created an expanding bubble of high-energy particles that would result in bright X-ray emission.

Instead, the Chandra data show levels of X-rays that are a factor of a few to several hundred times lower than expected for a rapidly spinning, merged neutron star and the associated bubble of high-energy particles, implying a black hole likely formed instead.

Jansky Very Large Array VLAresearchers explain the observed X-ray emission as being due entirely to the shock wave — akin to a sonic boom from a supersonic plane — from the merger smashing into surrounding gas.

There is no sign of X-rays resulting from a neutron star.

An analysis of the creation of a black hole in astronomic research

Thus, the researchers in this study claim this is a strong case for the merger of two neutron stars merging to then produce bursts of radiation and form a black hole. A paper describing this result appears in the latest issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters and is available online.Apr 11,  · Telescopes in Astronomy Once upon a time, we believed the Earth was at the center of our universe.

We were seriously mistaken.

GW Observation of a 19 Solar-mass Binary Black Hole Coalescence - IOPscience

We have come to find that at the center of most galaxies is a giant black hole that keeps everything together. The history of science during the Age of Enlightenment traces developments in science and technology during the Age of Reason, The scientific revolution saw the creation of the first scientific societies, While differing somewhat from a black hole.

The ergosphere of a black hole is a volume whose inner boundary is the black hole's oblate spheroid event horizon and a pumpkin-shaped outer boundary, which coincides with the event horizon at the poles but noticeably wider around the equator.

The neutron star merger that became the gravitational wave source, GW, likely birthed a black hole. This result comes from analysis of X-ray data from Chandra in the weeks and months after the initial detection of gravitational waves. Black holes were first proven to exist in the ’s when a few scientists identified a black hole called Cygnus X Since then, an intense amount of study has been dedicated to discovering the various properties of black holes.

"There are two ways in which mergers are likely to affect the central black hole. The first would be an increase in the amount of gas being driven towards the galaxy's centre, adding mass to both the black hole and the disc of matter around it," explains Colin Norman, co-author of the paper.

Black holes – News, Research and Analysis – The Conversation – page 1